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Dogs 101 - OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG - Top Dog Facts About the OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

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Brooklyns Corner

Dogs 101 OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG Top Dog Facts About the OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG

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The Old English Sheepdog is a large dog, known for its long coat and furry appearance. The breed is of relatively recent vintage, and was possibly developed from the Scottish Bearded Collie or the Russian Owtchar to defend flocks from predatory wolves on West England farms. Dogs similar to the modern Sheepdog or its immediate ancestors have been described in stories or depicted in paintings from the 1700s. By the mid1800s, the dogs were also being used widely to drive cattle and sheep to the market. The breed was initially known as the ‘Shepherd’s Dog’, and was first exhibited in a show in England in 1873. The Old English Sheepdog was given official recognition as a breed in 1888. With changes in the way farming is done, the breed remained a sheepdog in name and became more of a show dog. Its popularity as a show dog has been particularly high in the US, where at one time five of the ten wealthiest American families bred and showed the Old English Sheepdog.

Time for some Ruff Trivia:
The Old English Sheepdog is often called the ‘_______ Dog’ in UK and Australia. What brand name fills the blank?
o A: Dulux
o B: Dyson
o C: Dunlop
What do you think, give it your best guess in the comments below before we get to the answer! Hang on tight and we’ll get back to this Ruff Trivia Question toward the end of the video.

The height of the adult male Old English is at least 22 inches, and for the female the minimum height is 21 inches. The typical weight range for the male is 70 to 90 pounds, and for the female is 60 to 80 pounds. It is a strong, thickset, muscular dog, with a thick, hairy appearance. The double coat is profuse, but not excessive. The colors seen are shades of grey, grizzle, black, blue or blue merle, with occasional markings of white. The medium sized ears are flat along the side of the head. A muchtalked about feature of the dog is the bearlike shuffle of its gait.

Grooming: There is a popular perception that grooming is a major chore with an Old English Sheepdog, which is more fiction than fact. The breed does not shed heavily, and is not any more difficult to take care of than most other long haired dogs. A quick brush every alternate day can prevent matting and keep the coat clean. Regular trimming of nails, cleaning of ears and brushing of teeth are needed.

Environment: The Old English is a goodnatured, laidback animal. Many owners talk about clownish behavior, which comes partly from their constant urge to herd moving objects. It loves being around human beings, and is very good with children. But, because of their large size, and instinct to drive animals, its interaction with children should be supervised. It is generally friendly with strangers. It requires more space than most apartments can provide, but is also a homebody, and thus is best suited for suburban living.

Training: Early obedience training and training to fetch balls is a good way to channelize the breed’s energy. Some dogs of the breed can be headstrong, but nothing that some patience cannot overcome. A moderate to long walk on leash or a good game in the yard is needed daily.

Health: The life expectancy for the Old English Sheepdog is 10 to 11 years. Ailments seen commonly are hip dysplasia, cataracts, glaucoma, thyroid problems, deafness, diabetes, allergies and skin problems. The dog cannot bear heat. Cancer is a common cause of death.

A strong, intelligent animal, the Old English Sheepdog is widely loved for its cute looks and calm nature. It has not quite forgotten its cattle herding history, but that does not mean it cannot adapt to being part of a human family comfortably.

Find out if the Old English Sheepdog would be a good addition to your home. Now you can visit Brooklyn’s Corner.com to take our quiz and find out which dog would be the best match for you.

Music by Kevin McLeod Royalty Free

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